Free Pattern: Candy Corn Tawashi

Free Crochet Pattern: Candy Corn Tawashi

Free Pattern: Candy Corn Tawashi

Keep your home sparkling with these adorable and easy to make crocheted candy corn tawashi!

I realized my flower tawashi (also available on Ravelry) I had made were in need of replacement. I decided then that it was time to make a fall inspired tawashi.

This is a great little piece for using up bits of leftover yarn. Feel free to make them as cute or utilitarian as you want.

Skill Level

Beginner

Yarn Required

Any worsted weight, cotton yarn will work. The most economical, and easily acquired, are Lily Sugar n Cream, Peaches & Creme, and Bernat Handicrafter.

Traditional Candy Corn:

Small amounts of yellow, orange, and white

Indian Candy Corn:

Small amounts of brown, orange, and white

Materials

  • G crochet hook
  • Tapestry needle
  • Scissors

Abbreviations [US]

  • CH: Chain stitch
  • SC: Single crochet
  • INC: Increase.
    Two single crochets in one stitch
  • DEC: Decrease.
    Any decrease works, but I’ve found that invisible decreases work best
  • SL ST: Slip stitch
  • FO: Fasten off

Gauge

Gauge is not important

Front Piece

With yellow yarn (or brown for Indian candy corn version), CH 14.
Row 1: Starting in the second chain from hook, SC x 13. CH 1 and turn. (13)
Row 2: INC, SC x 11, INC. CH 1 and turn. (15)
Row 3: SC x 15. CH 1 and turn. (15)
Row 4: INC, SC x 13, INC. CH 1 and turn. (17)
Row 5: SC x 17. CH 1 and turn. (17)
Row 6: SC x 16. To transition to the orange yarn, insert the hook into the final stitch of row and draw up a loop in yellow (or brown) yarn. There are now two loops on hook. Take the orange yarn, with a tail about 6 inches long, and draw through both loops on hook to complete stitch. Tug the yarn ends to tighten stitch (it will remain loose until the ends are woven in). Cut yellow (or brown) yarn, leaving at least a 6″ tail. CH 1 with the orange yarn and turn. (17)

Continue with orange yarn.
Row 7: DEC, SC x 13, DEC. CH 1 and turn. (15)
Row 8: SC x 15. CH 1 and turn. (15)
Row 9: DEC, SC x 11, DEC. CH 1 and turn. (13)
Row 10: SC x 13. CH 1 and turn. (13)
Row 11: DEC, SC x 9, DEC. CH 1 and turn. (11)
Row 12: SC x 10. Transition to the white yarn in last SC using the color change method described above. Cut orange yarn, leaving at least a 6″ tail. CH 1 with the white yarn and turn. (11)

Continue with white yarn.
Row 13: DEC, SC x 7, DEC. CH 1 and turn. (9)
Row 14: SC x 9. CH 1 and turn. (9)
Row 15: DEC, SC x 5, DEC. CH 1 and turn. (7)
Row 16: DEC, SC x 3, DEC. CH 1 and turn. (5)
Row 17: DEC, SC x 1, DEC. CH 1 and turn. (3)
Row 18: DEC, SC x 1, finishing on wrong side of work. (2)

Fasten off and weave in all ends.

If desired, embroider a face onto the tawashi.

Back Piece

The back side is worked identically to the front, but without the color changes.

With orange yarn (or brown for Indian candy corn version), CH 14.
Row 1: Starting with the second chain from hook, SC x 13. CH 1 and turn. (13)
Row 2: INC, SC x 11, INC. CH 1 and turn. (15)
Row 3: SC x 15. CH 1 and turn. (15)
Row 4: INC, SC x 13, INC. CH 1 and turn. (17)
Row 5: SC x 17. CH 1 and turn. (17)
Row 6: SC x 17. CH 1 and turn. (17)
Row 7: DEC, SC x 13, DEC. CH 1 and turn. (15)
Row 8: SC x 15. CH 1 and turn. (15)
Row 9: DEC, SC x 11, DEC. CH 1 and turn. (13)
Row 10: SC x 13. CH 1 and turn. (13)
Row 11: DEC, SC x 9, DEC. CH 1 and turn. (11)
Row 12: SC x 11. CH 1 and turn. (11)
Row 13: DEC, SC x 7, DEC. CH 1 and turn. (9)
Row 14: SC x 9. CH 1 and turn. (9)
Row 15: DEC, SC x 5, DEC. CH 1 and turn. (7)
Row 16: DEC, SC x 3, DEC. CH 1 and turn. (5)
Row 17: DEC, SC x 1, DEC. CH 1 and turn. (3)
Row 18: DEC, SC x 1, finishing on wrong side of work. (2)

Fasten off and weave in all ends.

Stitching the Tawashi Together

You can choose to block the two tawashi pieces before crocheting together, but it’s not required since you’ll be washing dishes with it.

The two sides are crocheted together using SC. Sometimes the decreases make it difficult to tell where to crochet, but do the best you can.

You can attach yarn anywhere, but there’s a place I prefer to start. If you look at the work, you can see that the SCs join together in what, I think, look like little rows of bows. There are also ravines between these rows. The front of the piece has an orphan row where there aren’t any rows of bows formed. I attach the yarn into the first ravine on the right side (see second picture below).

Step 1: Place the wrong side of both pieces together and with front side facing forward, attach orange yarn.
Step 2: SC around until you reach the top two SCs (17 SC). Make two SCs in both stitches (4 SC).
Step 3: Continue to SC down the other side until you hit the final ravine. (38 SC total)
Step 4: For the bottom of the tawashi, crochet only through the front piece (the side with the color changes) and into the starting 13 chains. INC in first chain, SC x 11, INC in final chain (15 SC).
Step 5: SL ST into the first SC and FO (53 SC total).
Step 6: Weave in all ends.

All finished!

Extra

The tawashi is not closed on the bottom to help dry it faster. You can also try putting your hand into it (warning: results may vary).

You can also make a hanging loop if desired. Either FO at the top, Ch 10, and SL ST into a neighboring stitch to finish or simply CH 10 when you reach the top of the candy corn as you SC the two sides together.

Additional Notes

The tawashi will most likely be very stiff during the first several times of use, but it will soften up over time. You can also try stretching it beforehand to help loosen the cotton.

Candy corn tawashi used as a hanging decoration

Candy corn tawashi used as a hanging decoration

You can also use the tawashi as a hanging decoration. It’s best to crochet through both sides all the way around in this version.

Copyright Notice

All content and images are the intellectual property of Cedar & Linn. Permission is granted to print out an unlimited number of copies, but those copies may not be sold for profit. Do not host the written pattern on any website, except where authorized. Instead, link to the pattern on Ravelry and/or my blog (if applicable). This pattern may be used to create items for gifts, charity, or profit.

A West Coast native transported to the unfamiliar Midwest over a decade ago. Raquela has spent the last two decades working in digital media, including fractal art and web design. Her recent interests include knitting and crochet, with a concentration in lacework and amigurumi.

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